It’s pretty evident that Google is dominating in a number of places across the world that has access to the internet.  The search company has a global search market share of 54.7 percent in 2014.

Baidu.svgAround the end of December last year, Google appeared on China’s ban list.  Many of Google’s properties became unusable since most people in mainland China wasn’t able to use their services.  This gave China’s own search engine, Baidu, a rather sizable advantage since the ban.  Baidu’s global share of search ad revenues increased from 6.4 percent in 2013 to 8.8 percent in 2015.  This information is coming to us from eMarketer.

In the eMarketer report, it said “Baidu is reaping the benefits of Google’s ban in China—and of course, a massive and growing internet user population.”  It would make since that if China’s forcing Google out of the picture, more people would have no choice but to use their own native search engine.

For China, they will account for $14.90 billion (32 percent) of the global search spend in 2015, where as the U.S. will account for 25.66 billion in ad spend this year.  Is it possible that China could eventually overlap the U.S. spend based on China’s search growth of 32.8 percent this year?  At this rate, tt very well could.

What makes this increase in spend even more impressive for China is that the U.S. population has over 86 percent online usage, where as China has just 46 percent.  This information comes from Internet Live Stats.

Google’s search ad share has been predicted to shrink from 55.2 percent in 2013, to 54.5 percent in 2015.  Google’s revenues will still continue to outweigh the competition this year, while Baidu’s revenue is expected to grow from $5.35 in 2014 to $7.18 this year.

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